Nicholson project update

We’re going to make the cross members full height.  This will add to the torsional integrity of the bench, making it a very strong “box beam” structure.  We’ll locate the cross members with the help of a stopped sliding dovetail.  The lower portion of the cross member will be lagged into place to pull out any irregularity in the apron surface.  (If you choose to use a stopped dado, remember you’ll have to lag it top and bottom.)

026

Our dovetail is marked out and we’ll cut it will a backsaw.  Note that we aren’t using any saw guide blocks.  If you haven’t done much hand sawing, it might be a good idea to use a guide.

027

After we cut the “cheeks” of the dovetail, we remove the bulk stock.  A small router, router plane or simply “hogging” out with a bench chisel will do.  A sharp paring chisel will be required to do the final fit up.

029

Here we’re using the bench, prior to completion for some fair heavy chisel work.  Note that the bench is being held together with clamps.

025

 The finished joint and the full height cross member.  These two features add incredible stiffness and weight (always a good thing, in workbenches).

033

The storage shelf is put into place.  A ledger is added to the lower stretchers and loose shelf boards are laid in place.  Be sure to leave enough space to accommodate seasonal expansion.  Lapped jointed boards are probably NOT a good idea here, as falling debris will impede their movement.  Remember, this shelf is for big stuff, not jewelry.

035

The Crochet, or Hook, is attached to one of the top halves with lags.  It will be a great help while joining multiple boards.

036

Over the weekend, we’ll “roll this baby out”.  We’ll be exploring many of the work holding methods that the Nicholson bench accommodates.  Should be very illuminating.

 

 

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5 Comments on “Nicholson project update”

  1. Gary Says:

    HI, what does ‘lagging’ a joint mean?

    • D.B. Laney Says:

      The upper part of the cross member is held in place by a stopped, sliding dovetail. It serves as much for alignment as to strengthen the entire structure. The lower part of the cross member will be “lagged” in place with lag bolts (or 3/8″ hex headed lag screws, si vous preferez).

  2. Gary Says:

    can you post a pic showing this bit pls? I see the sliding dovetail joint flush with top, but there would be a bolt underneath?

  3. D.B. Laney Says:

    We’re haven’t bolted up yet, but my intention is to do a “gallery” of the entire project, so there’ll be more details posted in the next two weeks.


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